Our videos.

Our insight of what we judge to be the key macroeconomic, political or strategic events that could have a bearing on your investments.

My Word Is My Bond
After the Great Financial Crash of 2008, the US Federal Reserve (the Fed) embarked on an unconventional policy that became known as quantitative easing (or QE). The purpose of this policy was to attempt to reduce long-term interest rates, after the Fed funds rate had been cut to effectively zero. Crucially, it was also designed to provide support to asset prices and assist their appreciation.
My Word Is My Bond
After the Great Financial Crash of 2008, the US Federal Reserve (the Fed) embarked on an unconventional policy that became known as quantitative easing (or QE). The purpose of this policy was to attempt to reduce long-term interest rates, after the Fed funds rate had been cut to effectively zero. Crucially, it was also designed to provide support to asset prices and assist their appreciation.
A Longer-Term Perspective on Stock Markets
Stock markets fell sharply in October. Since then there have been big daily swings up and down, but no clear direction of travel. A number of risks are well known to investors.
A Sickly Panda
The G20 meeting has been and gone, and China and America have for now called a truce for 90 days rather than reignite their trade war on 01 January. We are fortunate to be able to analyse a vast array of data from a variety of sources, when it comes to assessing the health and trajectory of Western market economies, but that is not the case with China.  
Why The House (Or In This Case, The Bank of Japan) Always Wins…
As the Federal Reserve jolts financial markets across the World by indicating that US interest rates will continue to rise through 2019, the Bank of Japan follows a very different path. Indeed, the Bank of Japan Deputy Governor, Masazumi Wakatabe, declared earlier this year that “there are no limits to monetary policy”. If any one Central Bank is trying to prove this statement accurate (or a potential grand folly), it is the Bank of Japan.
Market Commentary 09 November 2018
Following a turbulent October, the Market was hoping that the US Mid-term elections this week could help to start a much needed Christmas rally.  The outcome largely matched the forecasts.  Democrats won control of the House (for the first time in 10yrs), while Republicans retained the Senate.
The Curse of Black Gold
From a low of $42 a barrel, in early February 2016, the Brent crude measure of oil has risen over 95% to stand at $82 a barrel at the end of September. Given that the US imposed sanctions on Iran which kick in next month and the Venezuelan economy may well be on the verge of collapse – then could we be on the cusp of another oil price shock with $100 a barrel being the near term target?